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Asia Youth International Model United Nations

Virtual Conference

"Finding Strategy In Tackling Current Global Security Challenges"

"Finding Strategy In Tackling Current Global Security Challenges"

CONNECT WITH MANY INTERNATIONAL YOUTHS

IN ONE OF THE BIGGEST MUN VIRTUAL CONFERENCES IN THE WORLD!

12th - 14th November 2021

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Today, our world is facing daunting challenges such as climate change, persistent poverty, entrenched inequalities, etc. Yet one key solution is empowered youths who want to take action to make a change.

Are you an individual who is ........

Worriying about your future

You think you lack of skills and don’t ready to pursue your dreams

Afraid of taking risks

You are afraid to take a lead and try something new

Struggling with making friends

You found that it is Difficult to improve your network

Confused about what actually your passion is

You do not know your life goals and dreams to achieve

Thinking that no opportunity knocks your door

You think that you don’t have the opportunity to develop yourself

Those things will just prevent you from being positive and successful. If you think you’re experiencing one or all of the above...
Don’t worry. Just keep reading and you’ll find your answer.

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United Nations Department of Economic and Social A airs (UNDESA) has stated that by 2030, the target date for the sustainable development goals, the number of youth is projected to have grown by 7%, to nearly 1.3 billion. Youth can be a positive force for development when provided with the knowledge and opportunities they need to thrive.

In particular, young people should acquire the education and skills needed to contribute in creating a better world, and they need access to opportunities that can upgrade their skills and make them readier to achieve their successful future. Joining an international conference like Model United Nations would be a good choice to improve youths’ skills and potential. So, if you are eager to be more positive and wish to improve your capacity, you should try Asia Youth International Model United Nations 2020.

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Asia Youth International MUN already have

372,200
Registrants
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5702
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100+
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Previous Asia Youth International
Model United Nations

Opening Ceremony Virtual Conference May 2021
Closing Ceremony Virtual Conference May 2021
Opening Ceremony Virtual Conference 2020
Highlight Virtual Conference 2020
Highlight Virtual Conference May 2021
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Join Asia Youth International MUN Virtual Conference and Experience a Life-Changing Moment

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Asia Youth International Model United Nations (AYIMUN) is a platform where youth mentality in leadership, negotiation, and diplomacy will be developed in a Model United Nations. Asia Youth International MUN aims to engage youth leaders from all over the world and to provide a platform to share perspectives and opinions in solving world issues.

We wish, by joining Asia Youth International Model United Nations, You could enhance capabilities and encourage yourself to develop networks, and also improve your communication and diplomatic skills. We invite and dare you to join us and experience this life-changing journey! It’s your turn to become part of a better future with thousands of youths from around the world!

Asia Youth International Model United Nations Virtual Conference
12 - 14 November 2021.

Benefits and improvements you will gain

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Public Speaking Skills

You will have several opportunities to improve your public speaking skills since you make multiple speeches during the overall MUN event.

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Crtical Thinking Skills

The delegates can develop their critical thinking skills by sharing their perspectives and communicating eąectively with others in finding solutions to complex problems.

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Diplomatic Skills

You will have several opportunities to improve your diplomatic skills since you will learn other cultures and perspectives, MUN will train you to be a more well-rounded and diplomatic conversationalist

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Leadership Skills

By joining MUN conference as a delegate, or in other words as a representative of a country, it can help you improve your leadership skills, especially in making a decision as a future leader. Your experiences as a delegate MUN will be good examples for you as a representative of a country as you will make a decision as a leader.

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Networking Skills

You will build new connections with all delegates, organizers, co-sponsors, speakers, and chairs. In other words, you have the opportunity to get new insights from the experts, especially in terms of creating your career development plan.

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Join Asia Youth International MUN Virtual Conference and Experience a Life-Changing Moment

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Delegate's Testimonials

Here's What They Said About Previous
Asia Youth International MUN

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Beh Zeh Ka

Malaysia

“As an undergraduate student pursuing in International A airs, Model United Nation (MUN) naturally drew my attention. It was my first MUN conferences in a foreign country. ”

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Kaycee P. Bugtong

Philippines

“The final hurdle of the AYIMUN before was one of the greatest moment in my experience as a traveller, youth, and a learner. While I assumed screeching expletives in the process, scratching our head endlessly to be better.

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Satzhan

Kazakhstan

“The benefits are: i have a made good networking relationship with other guys (we are still keep in touch), AYIMUN helped me to improve my presentation and visabilty skills”

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Tahiya Islam

Malaysia

“The most important learning experience I have gathered from AYIMUN is the confidence to engage in a diplomatic conversation with new people. I think, the fear of being judged and criticized has lessened a lot after attending.”

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Raiyan Mohamed Rashid

TANZANIA

“I had attended and hosted a number of diplomatic programs and meetings. However, I had not had a chance to meet people like me who were from all over the World. I created my organization to tackle global problems in my country.”

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Barani

Myanmar

“All I ever wanted was to widen my horizon, attain international exposure and accelerate my potential at public speaking even though I’d never known a thing about formal debates and position papers.”

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Satzhan

Kazakhstan

“The benefits are: i have a made good networking relationship with other guys (we are still keep in touch), AYIMUN helped me to improve my presentation and visabilty skills”

Council Overview

Alarming global health catastrophe : Prevention of the use of biological and chemical weapons for war and terrorism activities

WHO

Alarming global health catastrophe : Prevention of the use of biological and chemical weapons for war and terrorism activities

The possible development and use of chemical and bacteriological weapons and their destructive potentialities have been matters of concern to WHO for several years. The development, production and use of biological and chemical weapons are prohibited by international treaties to which most WHO Member States have subscribed, namely the 1925 Geneva Protocol, the 1972 Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention, and the 1993 Chemical Weapons Convention. Not all have done so, however, and valid concerns remain that some may yet use such weapons. Moreover, non-state entities may try to obtain them for terrorist or other criminal purposes. WHO is alarmed by serious reports of the use of highly toxic chemicals in an attack in Khan Shaykhun, Syria. According to Health Cluster partners on the ground treating the patients, at least 70 people have died and hundreds more have been affected (WHO, 2017). Doctors in Idlib are reporting that dozens of patients suffering from breathing difficulties and suffocation have been admitted to hospitals in the governorate for urgent medical attention, many of them women and children. Knowing the danger it will bring to the world, WHO delegates are required to discuss and formulate the policy or public health response not only to prevent but also to mitigate if it leads to the global health catastrophe.

Assisting and Ensuring The Education for Children in Conflict Zone

UNICEF

Assisting and Ensuring The Education for Children in Conflict Zone

Article 28 of the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child states that every child has the right to a formal education - yet, more than 32 million children across the world have never seen a teacher as a result of armed conflict. Around the world, attacks on children continue unabated, as warring parties flout one of the most basic rules of war: the protection of children. The protracted nature of conflicts today is affecting the futures of entire generations of children. Without access to education, a generation of children living in conflict will grow up without the skills they need to contribute to their countries and economies, exacerbating the already desperate situation for millions of children and their families. A child’s right to education cannot be safeguarded in conflict zones without education itself being protected as it can be a life-saver for them. However, the children are easy targets of abuse, exploitation and recruitment by armed forces and groups whenever they want to attend a school, which creates a dilemma to be addressed. Therefore, delegates need to ensure not only the education fulfillment can be ensured in conflict zones but also their protection in pursuing education

The Protection of Cultural Property In The Event of Armed Conflict and Natural Disaster

UNESCO

The Protection of Cultural Property In The Event of Armed Conflict and Natural Disaster

It is inevitable that during armed conflict cultural heritage will be damaged and destroyed. Whilst there has been widespread consideration of how to protect communities, their heritage has not received the same consideration. Cultural heritage includes tangible places (such as historic sites and buildings), and moveable artefacts (like archives, libraries, art, and museum collections). These are collectively often referred to as cultural property. It also includes intangible remains of the past such as song, dance, and oral traditions remembered and ‘carried’ by individuals and communities. Intangible cultural heritage can be considered as part of the wider framework of protecting civilians. However, tangible manifestations of cultural property are frequently dismissed. Therefore, the delegate needs to assess whether damage and destruction of cultural property really are inevitable, or whether at least some might be mitigated and avoided if appropriate action were taken

Combating The Operation of Transnational Organized Crime

INTERPOL

Combating The Operation of Transnational Organized Crime

Transnational organized crime is considered to be a changing and flexible phenomenon. While on one hand globalization has triggered easier and faster communication, movement of finances and international travel, it has also created opportunities for criminal groups to flourish, diversify and expand their activities. Organized crime today affects all States, whether as countries of supply, transit or demand. As criminal networks span the globe, efforts to combat them must likewise cross borders so as to ensure that organized crime networks do not simply divert their activities to countries or regions where weak cooperation means weak criminal justice responses. As the issues addressed happen to be broad for any transnational organized crime, INTERPOL delegates are expected to come up with sets of solutions that are able to not only address the issue generally but also to any specific transnational crime while upholding the applicable regulations.

Vaccines and The Recovery of World Tourism

UNWTO

Vaccines and The Recovery of World Tourism

The crash in international tourism due to the coronavirus pandemic could cause a loss of more than $4 trillion to the global GDP for the years 2020 and 2021 (UNCTAD, 2021). The estimated loss has been caused by the pandemic’s direct impact on tourism and its ripple effect on other sectors closely linked to it. With COVID-19 vaccinations being more pronounced in some countries than others, the report says, tourism losses are reduced in most developed countries but worsened in developing countries. This is due to COVID-19 vaccination rates being uneven across countries, ranging from below 1% of the population in some countries to above 60% in others. Moreover, the losses are worse than previously expected, as even the worst-case scenario UNCTAD projected last year has turned out to be optimistic, with international travel still low more than 15 months after the pandemic started. Developing countries have borne the biggest brunt of the pandemic’s impact on tourism. They suffered the largest reductions in tourist arrivals in 2020, estimated at between 60% and 80%. As tourism happens to be one of a backbone in our economy which creates a “trickle down” effect for some sectors, UNWTO delegates need to find the common ground and formulate a solution to address this issue.

The Rise of Digital Money and Fintech

IMF

The Rise of Digital Money and Fintech

Digitalization has revolutionized money and payments systems. Although digital money itself is not new to modern economies, digital currencies now facilitate instantaneous peer-to-peer transfers of value in a way that was previously impossible. New currencies will emerge as the central linchpins of large, systemically important social and economic platforms that transcend national borders, redefining the ways in which payments and users’ data interact. The advent of these new monies could reshape the nature of currency competition, the architecture of the international monetary system, and the role of government-issued public money. Digital money has already surfaced in a variety of contexts. WeChat and Alipay digital wallets have come to dominate the payments system in China. In Africa, mobile providers have launched successful money transfer services, such as Safaricom’s M-Pesa. Facebook has led the development of digital currencies for social media networks, announcing plans to issue its own currency, the Libra, which is a type of “stable coin” that will be pegged to a basket of official currencies. Finally, in recent years, thousands of fiat cryptocurrencies maintained on blockchains by anonymous record-keepers have been launched. The IMF delegates need to pinpoint and be able to regulate the The Rise of Digital Money and Fintech to ensure more benefits attained by member states and minimizing the potential risk that might arise

Question for State Responsibility : Addressing the Privatization of Migration & Refugee Services

UNHCR

Question for State Responsibility : Addressing the Privatization of Migration & Refugee Services

There are an estimated 244 million international migrants and about 50% of international migrants live in 10 urbanized, high-income countries. The estimated total number of refugees in the world is 21.3 million, representing 9 % of all international migrants. The large majority of refugees are hosted in developing regions. About a quarter are living in Turkey (2.5 million), Pakistan (1.6 million), Lebanon (1.1 million), and Iran (0.9 million). More than half (54%) of all refugees came from three countries: Syria (4.9 million), Afghanistan (2.7 million) and Somalia (1.1million). Privatised services cause the deaths of refugees and migrants across Europe due to poor care, destitution, unsafe living conditions, police violence and deportation. Countries with the highest number of reported deaths have privatised services for refugees and migrants. Detention affects the health of refugees and migrants in the short and long term and the mental health of staff is affected by working in detention centres. The Australian experience of ‘off-shoring’ shows that it results in poor quality services, the isolation of migrants and refugees from sources of support and the alienation of local populations. Refugees and migrants, especially children, regularly experience abuse which affects their physical and mental health. Health professionals are directly affected by working in ‘off-shored’ services and have their professional judgements undermined. Their professional ethical standards are compromised by working for privatised services and their own health is affected. Perceived as an action of States disengaging from this human rights obligation and delegating it to the private sector and through forms of off- shoring and outsourcing, delegates of UNHCR need to ensure the state’s contributions while taking into account the proper services for refugees.

Elimination of Forced Labor and Human Trafficking in the Global Supply Chain

ILO

Elimination of Forced Labor and Human Trafficking in the Global Supply Chain

Forced labor, trafficking, and modern slavery (referred to collectively herein as forced labor) are human rights abuses persistent in global supply chains. The International Labour Organization (ILO) estimates that, in 2016, 16 million people were in situations of forced labor in the private sector. Companies must be vigilant in their commitment to safeguard workers’ rights, in particular with regard to the risk of forced labor. Global efforts to tackle the problem of forced labor include new laws and regulations as well as new benchmarking initiatives aimed at highlighting the best and worst practices amongst companies. Companies face serious legal and reputational risks if they do not take effective action to prevent forced labor in their global supply chains. As delegates of ILO, who have the capability to have a standard setting, need to formulate a set of policy in addressing the issue in every supply chain.

Settling the problem of territorial disputes in the Arctic Region

SPECPOL

Settling the problem of territorial disputes in the Arctic Region

As more of the Arctic’s ocean is revealed from beneath these ice caps, it has opened resource extraction opportunities in the region. Within the late 20th and early 21st centuries, Arctic states have begun to increasingly vie for territorial control over the area in hopes of exploiting its reserves of oil and natural gas. It is estimated the Arctic holds 13% of the world’s oil and 30% of its undiscovered natural gas reserves. Access to the region’s resources offers enormous economic opportunities for Arctic states. However, according to international law, the North Pole and the Arctic Ocean cannot be claimed by any sole state. The Arctic is divided between the eight states that have territorial claims within the area. These states are America, Denmark, Norway, Sweden, Canada, Russia, Iceland, and Finland. Canada was the first Arctic state to claim vast land areas in the region in 1935, followed shortly after by the Soviet Union in 1937. The region’s strategic importance increased during the Cold War due to the potential to base submarine-launched nuclear weapons in the area, resulting in the ratified UNCLOS treaty at the end of the Cold War between the Arctic States. However, as global warming reduced ice caps in the region, the treaty has failed to clarify territorial disputes, increasing tensions between the Arctic states that is only expected to increase as more of the Arctic Ocean is released beneath the ice caps. Therefore, delegates of SPECPOL need to understand, be able to address the root causes and be able to find the middle ground of this prolonging issue.

Addressing The Fragility of Women’s Rights in Afghanistan

UNHRC

Addressing The Fragility of Women’s Rights in Afghanistan

The last time the Taliban held power was in the late ‘90s and early 2000s; repression, especially for women and girls, was a feature of its rule. Girls could not attend school, and women could not hold jobs or leave their homes without a male relative accompanying them. Those who defied Taliban’s directives and its fundamentalist interpretation of Islam were often brutally punished, with beatings or floggings. Afghan women and girls again, however, now find themselves in the untenable position of looking for help to the international communities, but these countries, the United States being a prime example, are pulling out. Although the Taliban leaders offered somewhat “gentler” rhetoric on women’s rights, there has still been a major disconnect between what has been said in media interviews and what the Taliban has enforced on the ground, where commanders often enforce harsh rules. Local commanders have, in recent months and years, taken actions such as closing girls’ schools entirely. Today, as Taliban forces have surged triumphantly across the country and capital, there have been alarming reports emerging of school closures, female movement restrictions, and women forced to leave their jobs. The UNHRC delegates need to come up with the sets of solutions in addressing the issues under our mandate’s capability.

Rundown AYIMUN Virtual Conference

Using Timezone (GMT+7 JAKARTA, INDONESIA TIME [WIB])

Delegates entering the Zoom Meeting

06.30 PM - 06.45 PM

Video Opening

06.30 PM - 06.45 PM

Opening by Master of Ceremony

06.50 PM – 07.00 PM

Opening Remarks by the Secretary-General

07.00 PM – 07.10 PM

Keynote Speech

07.10 PM - 07.30 PM

Virtual Cultural Performance

07.30 PM - 07.40 PM

Grand Symposium

07.40 PM - 08.10 PM

Question and Answer

08.10 PM - 08.30 PM

Introduction of Council, Secretariat & Board of Directors

08.30 PM - 08.50 PM

General Information

08.50 PM - 09.00 PM

Virtual Group Pictures

09.00 PM - 09.10 PM

Closing of the Opening Ceremony

09.10 PM

*The schedule may change, based on the condition.

Delegates Entering Zoom Meeting

08.30 AM - 09.00 AM

MUN 101

09.00 AM - 10.30 AM

Committee Session 1

10.30 AM - 11.30 AM

Coffee Break

11.30 AM - 11.45 AM

Committee Session 2

11.45 AM - 01.15 PM

Break

01.15 PM - 02.00 PM

Committee Session 3

O2.00 PM - 03.30 PM

Coffee Break

03.30 PM - 03.45 PM

Committee Session 4

03.45 PM - 05.00 PM

*The schedule may change, based on the condition.

Delegates Entering Zoom Meeting and Preparation

09.00 AM - 09.30 AM

Committee Session 5

09.30 AM - 11.00 AM

Coffee Break

11.00 AM - 11.15 AM

Committee Session 6

11.15 AM - 01.00 PM

Photo Session per Council

01.00 PM - 01.15 PM

Free Time & Break

01.15 PM

Delegates entering the Zoom Meeting

06.30 PM - 06.45 PM

Opening Video

06.45 PM - 06.50 PM

Opening by Master of Ceremony

06.50 PM - 07.00 PM

Virtual Cultural Performance from the Delegate

07.00 PM - 07.05 PM

Closing Remarks From The Secretary-General

07.05 PM - 07.15 PM

Virtual Cultural Performance from the Delegates

07.15 PM - 07.25 PM

Awarding Session: Phase 1

07.25 PM - 07.35 PM

Virtual Cultural Performance from the Delegates

07.35 PM - 07.45 PM

Awarding Session: Phase 2

07.45 PM - 07.55 PM

Virtual Cultural Performance from the Delegates

07.55 PM - 08.05 PM

Awarding Session: Phase 3

08.05 PM - 08.15 PM

Virtual Cultural Performance from the Delegates

08.15 PM - 08.25 PM

Virtual Photo Session

08.25 PM - 08.35 PM

*The schedule may change, based on the condition.

Let’s Your Voice be heard

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What is Asia Youth International MUN Virtual Conference ?

Asia Youth International MUN Virtual Conference is where the youth leaders from all around the world can practice their analytical thinking, public speaking and problem-solving skills through Online media platform. Due to limited access to travel, Asia Youth International MUN Virtual Conference provides the very easy access to participate in MUN and widen your network into the international level. We will conducting a conference by Online.

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MUN Virtual Conference!

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Here's what people are saying about AYIMUN

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Previous MUN Partners

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Previous AYIMUN Speaker

Sandiaga Salahudin Uno

Minister of Tourism and Creative Economy Republic of Indonesia 2020 - 2024

Andhika Sudarman

Founder & CEO of Sejutacita.id

Yoga Mahardika

Diplomat for The Directorate of ASEAN External Cooperation at Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Republic of Indonesia

Wishnutama Kusubandio

Head of Global Communication Service UNHCR

Guilherme Canela

Chief of the Section of Freedom of Expression and Safety of Journalists, UNESCO Communication and Information Sector

Dino Patti Djalal

Former Indonesian Ambassador To The United States

AYIMUN 2018 SPEAKER

Assc. Prof. Dr. Rosalia Sciortino Sumaryono

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AYIMUN 2018 SPEAKER

Sipim Sornbanlang, B.A., M.P.S., Ph.D

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AYIMUN 2018 SPEAKER

Charles Mohan

Founder of IOJ (Institut Onn Jaafar) Malaysia

AYIMUN 2019 SPEAKER

Frederika Alexis Cul

Miss Universe Indonesia 2019

AYIMUN 2019 SPEAKER

Joachim Babo

Australian Diplomat

AYIMUN 2019 SPEAKER

Diovio Alfath

Founder, Executive Director of Sandya Institute for Peace and Human Rights Indonesia

AYIMUN 2019 SPEAKER

Rehhahn Tudball

President of United Nations Association of Malaysia

AYIMUN 2020 SPEAKER

"Kim Trampe(Kim Ye Jun)

"I recommend as Youth of our future generation be part of good citizens and help the people around you. I'm excited to this event Thank you."

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